Feb 14, 2019

The New York Times Learning Network - Vocabulary Video Challenge

  • Crimson Education
  • Worldwide, China
Multiple Competition Skill Building

Description

The New York Times hosts different contests every year as an essential part of its mission of “teaching and learning with The New York Times.” Via essays, editorials, political cartoons, photography, videos, poetry, podcasts or culture reviews, NYT aims to hear from teenagers around the world on the issues and ideas of the day.

Since 2018, some of our winning student work has been featured in print in a new quarterly Times education section.

Vocabulary Video Challenge

We’ve been publishing a Word of the Day every school day since 2009, and in 2013, just as we were about to hit 1,000 words, we announced our first Vocabulary Video Contest. We liked the results so much that we’ve brought it back every year since.

Now, as our collection of words approaches 2,000, we’re once again inviting you to create a short video that defines or teaches the word of your choice.

 

  • All words must come from our Word of the Day feature.
  • Each word must be pronounced and defined, and the part of speech must be given. Please don’t forget; every year we have to disqualify many who fail to heed this rule.
  • All definitions must come from either the Word of the Day or Vocabulary.com. If there are several definitions, you may use just the first one if you like.

For more information visit the official website here.

Type of Opportunity

Extracurricular Activity

Age Range

N/A

Competitiveness

2/5

In 2018, 900-plus students participated—8 winners, 15 runner-ups, 15 honorable mentions

Participation Cost

2/5

Minimum Technical Skill Needed

Use your imagination. You can act the word out, animate it, use puppets, draw, sing a song, create a dance, incorporate photographs, create a Claymation, or anything else that will help viewers understand and learn your word.

Time Commitment

3/5

Application Deadline

Feb. 18, 2019

Application Process Includes

Post your video on YouTube, then post a link to that video in our comments section, along with the name or names of everyone who worked on it. Include the name of your school if you like.

Image

Youtube Video